Museum Ons’ Lieve Heer Op Solder


Amsterdam is home to some very interesting museums. Whether it’s museums housing works of art by some of the best painters in history or museums about the naval history of the Netherlands, there is something for people with different interests. At the heart of the bustling city centre in the Red Light District area is one of the oldest museums in the city: Museum Ons’ Lieve Heer op Solder. This is the museum where visitors experience the Dutch Golden Age in a special way; a beautiful and unique 17th-century house with a church in the attic. No less than 350 years ago, Jan Hartman bought the building on Oudezijds Voorburgwal together with the two adjacent buildings on Heintje Hoekssteeg. He converted the attic floors of the three houses into a Catholic church entirely in accordance with the then prevailing rules; nothing on the outside suggested that it was a church.

A Catholic Church in the Attic of a 17th-Century House

To ensure the preservation of the monument, all living spaces, stairs and the beautiful attic church had to be restored. As a visitor, you experience what the house church looked like when it was used as a Catholic church. Color, light and decoration exude the atmosphere of the period in which the last masses took place in the attic church at the end of the 19th century. The clandestine churches were of great importance during this period because they marked the beginning of religious tolerance. A free audio tour tells the stories of the different periods in the house. The museum has a new entrance building with a shop and a cosy café. This way you can enjoy a drink and a snack after the walk.

– Order your tickets via Tiqets.com make sure to use our exclusive discount code ‘THINGSAMS05’ and get 5% discount –

Museum Ons’ Lieve Heer op Solder For Children

Ons Lieve Heer op Solder also has a couple of activities for children from 5 to 10 years old. Little children can go on a quest or a scavenger hunt in search of the ‘Lieveheerbeestje op Solder’. This is available for only 1 euro at the reception. For children from 10 to 12 years old, there is a free audio tour “Feest! op Solder” or “Party! On Solder” in English. During this audio tour, the children learn more about the origins of Christian holidays, such as Sinterklaas, Christmas, Easter and Pentecost.

History of the Museum Ons’ Lieve Heer op Solder

The corner building on the Oudezijds Voorburgwal dates from around 1630 but was radically rebuilt in 1661 – 1663 by the new owner, the Roman Catholic stockbroker Jan Hartman, whose son Cornelis studied as a priest. Amsterdam had just been retaken by Protestants led by William of Orange from the Spanish Catholics who ruled over the Dutch Republic. Although the new Dutch Republic was a Protestant government, they agreed that everyone should be allowed the freedom of conscience. It meant that people of all faiths were allowed to worship anyhow they saw fit as long as they kept it within closed doors. This tolerance also contributed to the prosperity of Amsterdam in the 16th century as lots of merchants flocked to the city with their businesses which further strengthened the economy. One of these merchants was Jan Hartman, a Catholic faithful. Since Catholics and people of other faiths were allowed to practice their faith behind closed doors, a lot of house churches started to spring up in Amsterdam. Jan Hartman bought the building on the Oudezijds, established the stocking shop in the front house and a beautiful reception room on the main floor of the back house. In the attic, he set up a house church which was arranged over two back houses in the alley. It is the only one of the formerly numerous Amsterdam attic churches that have been preserved in almost their original state. The successive owners continue to rent the church, even if they themselves were Protestants, to Roman Catholic clergy.

The church was referred to as the Deer (after the coat of arms of Hartman) or also called Het Haantje (a corruption of Heintje, of the Heintje Hoekssteeg). The current name Ons ’Lieve Heer op Solder dates from the nineteenth century. The house church was dedicated to St. Nicholas, who until the Alteration of 1578 (when the city government was taken over by Calvinists) had been the patron saint of the Oude Kerk and of the city of Amsterdam. In 1887, the Sint Nicolaaskerk on the Prins Hendrikkade was opened, the third consecutive church dedicated to Sint Nicolaas. The house church had now lost its function and threatened to disappear. Thanks to the Amstelkring association, consisting of Roman Catholic Amsterdammers, the building with the house church was saved and in 1888 furnished as the Roman Catholic Museum in Amsterdam, now the Amstelkring Museum. The museum gives a picture of a rich merchant’s house with a Roman Catholic house church that was decorated on the upper floors.

The 17th-Century House

The original layout of a seventeenth-century residence with the church above is particularly well preserved. The complex consists of a front house and two original rear houses, each with an entrance on the Heintje Hoekssteeg. In the eighteenth century, the neck gable made way for the current spout façade, the wooden lower part with windows for a stone lower part. The entrance, accessible via a sidewalk, gives access to the front house. The front room was originally used as a retail space, but in 1770 it was converted into a living room. The marble fireplace in Louis XV style dates from that time, with the characteristic asymmetrical shell in the middle. The original interior fireplace, behind the retail space, still has a beamed ceiling from around 1630.

The room on the first floor is a high room that covered two original floors. It was initially given a sophisticated, classic seventeenth-century design with the fireplace as an eye-catcher. The oak fireplace rests on white-veined black marble pilasters and helical columns. The chimneypiece is a Dutch copy of the “Presentation in the Temple” by the Venetian painter Andrea Schiavone.

The Church in the Attic

The house church covers three floors and extends over both back houses. Catholic churchgoers could reach the church through an entrance on the Heintje Hoeksteeg. From there a spiral staircase led up. There was also a private entrance from the house, a stairway dating from the seventeenth century. Halfway up the stairs was a built-in bedroom in front of the curate.

By creating large openings in two successive beams, a high church space has been created with two galleries. The galleries are interconnected by iron tie rods which in turn are attached to rods attached to the hood. Because the house is on the corner of the Heintje Hoekssteeg, the narrow church space receives light not only through the facade but also through the side wall.

By creating large openings in two successive beams, a high church space has been created with two galleries. The galleries are interconnected by iron tie rods which in turn are attached to rods attached to the hood. Because the house is on the corner of the Heintje Hoekssteeg, the narrow church space receives light not only through the facade but also through the side wall.

The current baroque interior is largely eighteenth-century. The visual centre of the room is the richly executed altar from around 1715 that is framed by marble columns and stucco. The altarpiece with the “Baptism in the Jordan”, painted by Jacob de Wit in 1736, forms thematically a unity with the stucco above it where God the Father and the Holy Spirit are depicted, surrounded by clouds and cherubim. The painting could be exchanged for other representations in accordance with the liturgical celebrations of the church year, Christmas, Easter and Pentecost. Due to the limited space, the mahogany pulpit could be ingeniously turned away in one of the pillars of the altar. To the left of the main altar, in the second annexe, is the side altar dedicated to Mary, the mother of Jesus Christ. The organ opposite the main altar was made especially for this room in 1794. The organ builder was Hendrik Meyer who applied his monogram to the back of the organ. The bellows are located in a cupboard in the corner from where a wooden tube led the air to the organ.

Museum Café

The museum café is on the first floor. In this open, brightly lit room, visitors can enjoy a cup of coffee or tea with a delicious piece of cake, a delicious lunch or a special beer from the Prael brewery. The wall-wide curtain is a design by Theo Tienhooven. This wall curtain is based on the authentic colours found in the historic building and brought back during the restoration. The café is easily accessible by stairs and an elevator. Entrance to the museum café is only possible with a museum ticket. The museum café is open from 10:30 AM to 5:00 PM and on Sunday from 1:00 PM to 5:30 PM.

Museum Shop

The museum shop is located on the ground floor and offers a wide range of books, gifts and souvenirs. The store is easily accessible. Among other things, the publication Ons ’Lieve Heer op Solder is available in the museum shop. It’s the perfect place to shop for your unique souvenirs.

Ons Lieve Heer Op Solder Photo Impression

We paid a visit to the Museum Ons Lieve Heer Op Solder and took some pictures. The museum was very interesting and there was so much to learn. There was no queue and the staff was very helpful. We highly recommend this museum. Please take a look at some of our pictures for the first impression of the museum.

Beginning of the tour at the Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam

Once you’ve passed the ticket counter, you have to go downstairs to relax and watch the introduction video. Here you’re told why the museum has the name Ons Lieve Heer op Solder and what it means. You’re also given a little history of Amsterdam and how that history has influenced the name of the museum.

A 16th Century Meeting Room at the Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam

After a brief history of the museum, you’re led upstairs to view the museum just as it was in the 16th century. Here is a 16th-century meeting room (probably for the priest and other church leaders) in the museum.

16th Century Fireplace at the Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam

A 16th-century fireplace in the museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam.

Ceramic plates found under the Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam

Here is a collection of 16th-century ceramic plates in the museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam. These plates were found under the museum during an excavation of a sewage system.

A 16th Century church inside the Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam

Here is a 16th-century church in the Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam. It was reconstructed exactly as it used to be in the 16th century. There is a detailed explanation of how the church was built and how important it was to Catholics in the 16th century.

16th Century Kitchen at the Museum Ons Lieve heer op Solder Amsterdam

Here is a 16th-century kitchen in the museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam.

Petrus Parmentier - First Priest at the Ons Lieve Heer op Solder church Amsterdam

Petrus Parmentier was the first Priest sent to head the house church in Amsterdam. He was the Priest who led mass every day at the Ons Lieve Heer op Solder church.

Confession box in the Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam

One of the pillars of the Catholic Church is Confession. Here is a 16th-century Confession Box in the museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam.

Altar of the 16th century church in the Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam

The altar of the church in the museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam.

Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam Café

When you’re done taking a tour of the museum, don’t forget to relax for a cup of coffee in the Museum Ons Lieve Heer op Solder Amsterdam Café.

Opening Hours Ons Lieve Heer Op Solder Amsterdam

Museum Ons ’Lieve Heer op Solder is open every day. The ticket shop closes at 5.45 pm. The museum is only closed on King’s Day.

Monday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sundays from 1 pm to 6 pm.

The museum is open from 1 pm to 5 pm on 1 January, 25 December and 26 December
The museum is open from 10 am to 4 pm on 31 December

Monday – Saturday 10:00 – 18:00 || Sunday – 13:00 – 18:00
December 25 & 26 13:00 – 17:00 || January 1 – 13:00 – 17:00
King’s Day Closed ||

Museum Ons Lieve Heer Op Solder Tickets Prices

Tickets are available at the entrance of the Museum Ons Lieve Heer Op Solder. The regular admission price at the entrance is €12,50- for a regular adult ticket. Due to the limited capacity of the museum, groups are asked to register in advance. An audio tour is included in the admission price and is available in Dutch, English, French, German and Spanish. A guided tour can be organized on request and is also available in Dutch, English, French and German.

Guided tours cost € 95 for a 1.5-hour tour, € 70 for a 1-hour tour of only the highlights of the museum (maximum 10 people per guide, 2 guides available at the same time).

Note: Group bookings do not include the entrance fee. Groups are kindly requested to register in advance via the booking office: call 020 523 17 20 (Monday to Friday from 1 pm to 5 pm) or send an email to [email protected].

Cards & Vouchers
CJP, Student card, ISIC – € 10.00
Museum card, ICOM, Rembrandt card, City pass  – Free
I Amsterdam City Card, Holland Pass voucher – Free
Food Bank Culture – Free

Regular entrance prices at the door

Adults€ 12,50-
Child 5 – 17€ 6,-
Child 0 – 4€ Free
Group€ 95 for a 1.5-hour tour, € 70 for a 1-hour tour

– Order your tickets via Tiqets.com make sure to use our exclusive discount code ‘THINGSAMS05’ and get 5% discount –

Address, Contact Information and Route to the Museum

Museum Ons’ Lieve Heer op Solder is easily accessible by public transport. The museum is approximately a five-minute walk from Amsterdam Central Station and from Nieuwmarkt metro station. With trams 4, 14 and 24 visitors can get off at the Dam Square, from where it is also a five-minute walk. If you come by car, you can park in the parking garage of the Bijenkorf (Dam) or in the parking garage at Amsterdam Central Station. 020 624 66 04

Address
Museum Ons Lieve Heer Op Solder
Voorburgwal 38 – 40
1012 GD Amsterdam
+31 (0)20 624 6604
[email protected]
https://www.opsolder.nl/en

Museum Ons Lieve Heer Op Solder Amsterdam

Public Transport to the Museum

You can get to the museum from many parts of Amsterdam. One of the easiest ways is to go via from Amsterdam Central station or the Leidseplein. You can take the tram or the metro. The following trams and metros will take you to the museum:

From Amsterdam Central Station:

      • Tram 4, heading to Amstelstation – Stop at Dam Square
      • Tram 14, heading to Flevorpark – Stop at Dam Square
      • Tram 24, heading to VU Medisch Centrum – Stop at Dam Square

From Amsterdam Central Station By Metro:

      • Metro 51, heading to Isolatorweg – Stop at Nieuwmarkt
      • Metro 53, heading to Gaasperplas – Stop at Nieuwmarkt

From Amsterdam Leidseplein:
Tram 2 or 12, heading to Amsterdam Central Station, stop at Dam Square

With the widget below you can find accurate advice for the real-time travel times based on your current location. This application will help you when you are not sure which bus or tram you can take from your location.

Ons Lieve Heer Op Solder Amsterdam FAQ

Can I visit the Museum in a wheelchair?

Yes, the entrance to the Museum Ons’ Lieve Heer op Solder is wheelchair friendly. There is also a disabled toilet and a lift to the temporary exhibition and museum café.

Can I come in with food or eat in the museum?

No, eating and food aren’t allowed in the museum.

Is it allowed to take pictures in the museum?

Yes, but it is not allowed to take pictures with flash or to film with light. Tripods, selfie sticks and lamps are only permitted with prior written permission.

Can I bring a group and gain access to the museum without prior booking?

No, due to the limited space in the historic house, it is necessary that all groups, including school groups, book in advance. This way, the museum can spread the number of visitors as much as possible and guarantee that every group gets a good tour of the museum.

How much time do I need for a tour of the museum?

Visitors usually need about 45 – 50 minutes for a complete tour of the museum.

Is the museum suitable for children?

Yes, the museum is suitable for children of all ages.

Are pets allowed in the museum?

No, pets aren’t allowed in the museum.

 

Note: Stiletto heels are not permitted in the museum!

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